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Woman broke her nail in club and went to A&E and other NHS time-wasters revealed

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Among the other absurd reasons given to doctors and nurses were someone asking for a bed because ‘they couldn’t get a good night’s sleep at home’, a paper cut and someone with a cold sore.

Poole Hospital and Royal Bournemouth Hospital in Dorset have revealed the examples of people seeking medical treatment for minor ailments, as figured reveal that each UK hospital deals with around 10,000 time wasters a year.

Research by the Royal College of Emergency Medicine suggest 15 per cent of A&E patients could get help more appropriately elsewhere.

A single visit to A&E costs a minimum of £59 and unnecessary attendances cost the taxpayer millions of pounds each year.

During times of increased pressure on our services it is particularly important that the public make informed decisions

Richard Renaut – Chief operating officer Royal Bournemouth Hospital

Bournemouth and Poole hospitals also had incidents of people going to A&E for mild sore throats and mild sun burn.

Both have urged people only to attend A&E if their condition is a genuine emergency.

Richard Renaut, the chief operating officer at the Royal Bournemouth Hospital, said: “During times of increased pressure on our services it is particularly important that the public make informed decisions about the most appropriate way to access the care they need.

A woman struggling to get a good night's sleepGETTY

One person asked for a bed because ‘they couldn’t get a good night’s sleep at home’

“While we will always do our best for everyone who comes, time spent treating minor ailments reduces the time we have to treat seriously unwell patients who come through our doors.”

Geoffrey Walker, matron for emergency care at Poole Hospital, said: “A&E departments are for serious illness or injury and it’s important to stress that the vast majority of patients do access the service appropriately.

“For those that don’t need A&E there are many alternatives where people’s health needs may be met more appropriately and which could offer faster access to care.

“These include GPs, including out of hours, walk-in centres, minor injuries units, pharmacists and the NHS 111 telephone service.

“Using these services where appropriate means our focus can be on patients that really need to be in an A&E unit.”

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